My Portable Playstation, NOT a PSP

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If you could choose between owning a handheld Playstation 1 or handheld Playstation 2, which would you pick? PS2 is the obvious choice; it has better graphics, doubles as a DVD player, and it plays the entire library of PS1 games with (from what I hear) only one or two exceptions.

I’m surprised I haven’t gotten a lot of criticism for this so far, but I opted to build a portable gaming device using a PSone, the smaller, revised Playstation 1 model.

The build began in the summer of 2014 during a build competition and I had to delay this project because my carelessness caused me to burn out the first system board I was working with. An additional fried PSone and two overhauls on the case’s body later and I can call this portable finally complete.

The portable contains two 7.4V camcorder batteries, wired together for approximately 4400 mAh of juice. A standard-sized PS1 memory card is permanently wired up to slot 1, so I never have to worry about forgetting a memory card at home. I’ve also included a mem card slot to accept additional cards, so I can transfer saves if I decide I want to continue my game on an unmodified console.

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Luma 64 – a portable Nintendo 64

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Without a doubt this post is long overdue. After roughly five years of off-and-on work, I completed my Nintendo 64 portable gaming device, dubbed Luma 64. I built the shell out of two Tupperware-style containers; one comprised the bulk of the handheld while the other was chopped apart and used as an extension to house the cartridge slot. I doubt I’ll ever use a case like this for any future projects because it ends up being rather thick for a portable and as polished as I tried making the end result, it’s still not very professional. As a friend of mine put it, “you can be the best case-maker in the world, but at the end of the day it’s still Tupperware.”

One feature I made sure to include in this handheld is a LOB64 jack. This multiplayer/AV out jack isn’t built into very many Nintendo 64 portables, but the idea upon its inception was to create a standard connection throughout the modding world. The more portables that incorporate the standard, the more likely you are to encounter another LOB64 portable at a convention or expo.

In the Pages of Guitar World

I don’t claim to be a good guitar player. I can strum my way through most songs on barre and power chords and I have a fairly decent sense of rhythm. But a guy like me isn’t going to make it into the pages of a major guitar magazine without doing something that will turn a few heads. And apparently I managed to pull that off.

If you happen to find a copy of the Holiday 2015 issue of Guitar World magazine, flip to the inside of the back cover, where I’m proud to announce that my Guitar Boy has been featured in the regular “It Might Get Weird” column. I know that my guitar received some attention when it made the rounds on Facebook (pretty impressive for a guy without an account!) as well as a few other news sites, but making it into the pages of a printed publication sold nationwide quite honestly has me flying on cloud nine.

With my work now in print, I keep thinking of the Dr. Hook song “Cover of the Rolling Stone” where they sing, “Wanna buy five copies for my mother.” Sorry, Mom. I’ll buy you one copy.

New Colecovision Controller and Composite Mod

Controller Done

This is a project I’ve been working on for a little in between getting busy with life. Because my secondhand Colecovision (should we just assume that all Colecovisions are secondhand at this point?) came with no controllers, I made my own out of a broken NES controller. I used the original NES controller board and shell, with the cable being pulled from a damaged Playstation 2 controller.